Divya and Sweta Srinivasan: Girls for Science

Divya and Sweta Srinivasan: Girls for Science

Dance (1).JPG

About the founders: Sweta and Divya Srinivasan are 15 year old twin sisters from Florida. They are in 10th grade and are in the International Baccalaureate program. They are the founders of Girls for Science and hope to positively impact girls around the world.

Divya Srinivasan is a 15 year old activist and co-founder of Girls for Science. She is working towards change both locally and abroad and hopes to increase the amount of women in STEM in order to help close the gender gap. Along with competing in science competitions, she enjoys producing short films, dancing, and taking Polaroids.

Sweta Srinivasan is 15 years old and is the co-founder of Girls for Science. She hopes to close the gender gap by inspiring girls worldwide to enter the STEM fields. She has a passion for competing in science fairs, producing short films, and learning Indian classical dance.

Film Fest Picture.JPG

Girls for Science was created when we realized that there are many girls around the world who have a disadvantage when it comes to pursuing careers in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields. We wanted to expose the aspects of the STEM fields to girls worldwide, therefore founding Girls for Science. We have been competing in science fairs and science competitions since the 4th grade, which is what truly sparked our love for STEM. We have also learned a lot about the importance of science from our mother, who is a physician, and from our father, who is a software engineer. We are so fortunate to have gotten this exposure to science early on in our lives. Realizing this is what made us want to be that exposure to the many girls around the world. In India, many girls are not taught about the importance of science, and our goal is to inspire them to learn more about STEM as a whole. India is where we began to inspire girls, and we hope to spread our influence worldwide. We founded Girls for Science in the summer of 2017. Our very first project was held in a school in Mysore, India, where we held a one week workshop about disease prevention and the importance of science in our everyday lives. The following year, we went back to the same school to talk about the different women in the STEM fields that made a major impact on our world today. We also gave three girls, who were the top in their science class, scholarships. Often times, girls are not motivated to pursue STEM, or do not have the monetary ability to pursue STEM, so a scholarship can greatly help them. In the Fall of 2018, we held a workshop in our local elementary school, where our love for the STEM fields came from. We held a 7-week after school club in which we talked about the influential women in the STEM fields and did an activity based on their findings and achievements. In addition to our love for the STEM fields, we also have a love for dance. We have been learning Bharatanatyam, a form of Indian classical dance, since the age of 5. We are able to express ourselves through the emotions and intricate steps that accompany this prestigious art form. We also love to express our Indian culture through directing and producing short films. Our most recent short film, “Keeping Culture Close,” is about how second-generation Indians preserve South Indian culture and traditions. We have also made a short film called “Orange Avenue,” about how our grandfather pursued through racism when moving from India to the United States. Our short films have been showcased at the South Asian Film Festival in both 2017 and 2018. Through short films, we are able to express our perspective on different topics and issues on the Indian culture.

If we want to reach real peace in this world, we should start educating children.
— Mahatma Gandhi

Our goal is to help close the gender gap through educating girls around the world about the STEM fields. Whether or not they pursue a career in the STEM fields, we hope that everyone learns to appreciate one another. We strive to be a part in all genders reaching full equality, and that everyone is able to pursue the same career and interests regardless of who they are.

 

Sophie Maniscalco and Kailin Zhang: Supergirls Code

Sophie Maniscalco and Kailin Zhang: Supergirls Code

Make Muse: Making Change

Make Muse: Making Change