Taylar Enlow: Sonku Writers

Enlow is a young Black woman creative living in America, and she recognized that the odds are stacked against her as well as people like her. Sonku is the result of that, the brainchild of someone who understands what it isn’t like to be seen or heard.

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Hafeezat Bishi
Maya Siegel: Writer, Survivor, Environmental Advocate

Maya has never seen her work as simply “activism.” She considers it as much a part of her life as academics or athletics. For her, being informed about current issues isn’t enough. Her career goals involve environmental nonprofit work as well as continuing to grow Space to Speak so that she can work to reduce sexual violence by furthering sex education and consent education.

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Anonymous
Boshemia Magazine

We are witnessing a shift in mainstream culture that has made room for feminist dialogue and pop culture. We think that this welcoming attitude for feminist discourse has embraced our publication and platform and made room for us to come through and capture new readers.

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Gretta Kissell
Emma Tang: Intersectional.abc

As a person who crosses over in many intersections, I feel that it is my duty to stand up for issues specifically that affect me as well as ones that don’t. As a Taiwanese-American, I named my account “abc” to emphasize the need for Asian activism.

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Zehra Naqvi
Alexis Galamay: The Petite Introvert

Alexis Galamay, a Filipino-Japanese American raised in South Florida, is a rising fourth-year pharmacy student. She is the creator of The Petite Introvert, a blog empowering Introverts to find lifestyle balance between self care and self growth.

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Gretta Kissell
Olivia Ferrucci: Lithium Magazine

“I always like to say that Lithium was born out of both frustration and inspiration. Entering my freshman year of high school, I kept turning the pages of mainstream, female-centric magazines waiting to see girls my age talk about being a teenager in all of its awkward complexity. But instead, all I found were twenty-somethings explaining what it was like to be me."

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Olivia Ferrucci
Maya Dummett: Amplifying Our Voices

I am aware that I am sometimes perceived differently by others. I am also aware that my life experiences are unique in comparison to those outside of the my community. Over time and after many interactions with other activists, I realized that this was a common experience among people of color. After that, I really began to see that there was a place for me in the world of social justice and advocacy.

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Anonymous
Nadya Okamoto: A Woman Changing the World

Nadya Okamoto, who grew up in Portland, OR, is 21-years-old Harvard student on a leave of absence. She is the Founder and Executive Director of PERIOD (period.org), an organization she founded at the age of 16. PERIOD is now the largest youth-run NGO in women’s health, and one of the fastest growing ones here in the United States.

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Gretta Kissell
Addis Boyd: Sistas of Liberty

“I wanted to create an image that sparked the same inspiration for young girls, like my little sister, to realize that they too have power and more than every reason to have equal rights and chase their dreams.”

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Gretta Kissell
Belén Cahill: Let's Get This Head

I want to hear about the unique struggles and pleasures of as inclusive a pool of people as possible—a variation of religious, geographical, and ethnic backgrounds, of gender, sexual and racial identities, and of physical ability. The single most important aspect of this show to me is that people walk out of the studio feeling empowered.

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Gretta Kissell
Jamie Zella: Body Positivity

I use my voice to speak about body positivity because nearly everyone has struggled with their body image at some point in their life. We grow up being bombarded with ads on how to lose weight in order to get the “perfect summer body”. We are told that the only way to be beautiful is to be skinny. So of course we accept that as truth and believe that the problem is with ourselves and not with society.

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Gretta Kissell
Ramya and Alice: REPRESENT MVMNT

We are a youth-led organization that strives to promote diversity while reducing Eurocentrism stemming from the media and education system. Through education, representation, and creating a discussion surrounding this issue, we hope to do our part in making society better for POC.

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Gretta Kissell
Leah Berdysz: Empowered & Poised

Creating Empowered & Poised meant that I could make a positive difference in the lives of others. I could share my passion for overall wellness to empower and educate girls on how to be beautiful from the inside out. Empowered & Poised has grown into a supportive community, where females can share their stories, learn, and have a platform for their voices to be heard.

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Gretta Kissell
Kareem Abukhadra: Forgotten Neighbors

“Over the last year, I’ve walked around the streets of New York, slept at homeless shelters, and served at soup kitchens. In the process, I’ve interacted with hundreds of homeless people, from addicts, to artists, to people who’ve lost their jobs working at Morgan Stanley and ended up homeless. I started Forgotten Neighbors to share the stories the individuals in this community were telling me.”

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Zehra Naqvi
Maheen Iqbal: Defiant

“I hope that Defiant serves as a platform and inspiration to others just like me who have felt the evident presence of discrimination in their day-to-day lives, based on factors entirely out of their control. To the disenfranchised youth of the world: We see you. We hear you. We will fight with you and for you.”

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Gretta Kissell
Zoe Harveen Kaur: ZHK Designs

“ZHK Designs was created to educate others and enhance various identities, cultures and backgrounds through art. I wanted to create a page that was not only directed at the South Asian community, but could be a safe space for all individuals”

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Gretta Kissell
Chanice Lee: A Young Revolutionary

“I am a young Black woman. Those are two identities that I value and cherish dearly, although they come with a history of hardships. My race and my gender both affect how I view the world and my experiences within it. Because of my identity, I always aim to amplify and center the voices of Black women and girls in everything that I do, as often as possible.”

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Gretta Kissell